Monday Madness

Methods in the Madness…11.17.14

Welcome to this week’s Methods in the Madness (information we frequently answer, or wish talent knew/would do/wouldn’t do…)

 

HELP US HELP YOU TIP #19 –  To easily track which jobs are outstanding and also keep hard copies all in one place, when you receive Houghton check, attach the stub to your copy of the voucher.  Then you can easily see what’s outstanding and everything is together when you get ready to do your taxes. Reminder: Deb says turn in a voucher for any job you want to get paid for,whether the client signs it or not, even if others on set tell you it’s not necessary. We need it every time…

 

YOU CAN’T KNOW TIL YOU KNOW TIP #19 – Vimeo on “Mastering Mobile Video”:  http://vimeo.com/videoschool/lesson/497/ep1-welcome-to-mastering-mobile-video?utm_campaign=25982&utm_medium=newsletter-vvs-school-201401016&utm_source=email

 

NEWSY BIT – Getting copies of commercial and industrial work happens maybe 50% of the time.  We ask for a copy when we invoice, and will get it right to you if we receive but we ask that you reach out to us only once bc either it will come and we’ll fwd or we can’t get it and sadly, can’t chase after it.  Pls don’t think we don’t agree it’s important but the demands of the day just don’t allow us to go backward much…

 

Here are some ways it usually plays out when talent ask for or are promised a copy:

  • Industrial material is often confidential so clients unwilling to share.
  • Producer sends of their own initiative (this is perfection)
  • Copy is made available but for a fee, anywhere from $30-70 
  • Producer commits to send but w/the next project, it’s forgotten or overlooked

Here’s a great tip from commercial director Scott Young on getting copies (see What You Need to Know About Commercial Reels, backstage.com)   http://www.backstage.com/advice-for-actors/commercials/what-you-need-to-know-about-commercial-reels. Note:  This post is from 2011 so a few elements have changed but overall it’s a good reference w/ accurate info.

 

“When on a set, hang on to your call sheet. Try and find out when and from whom you can get the final piece. It’s easier to get some answers while you’re there on the set versus a couple weeks later calling around. You don’t want a DVD; you want a finished QuickTime [file]. Often someone can send you a link to the work. Anything you have on DVD should be ripped and turned into QuickTimes before you go to an editor, if possible. It will save you money. There are free programs you can find on the Internet, like MPEG Streamclip, that will do this.”

 

Even in that case, reaching out no more than two times is our suggestion.

 

Thanks, have a great week!